Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, 3:45-5 p.m.

Attracting and Keeping Visitors Downtown
Friday, 3:45-5 p.m., Room 206, 2nd floor, Hynes Convention Center
Presented by the Massachusetts Mayors’ Association
Each community has its own version of downtown. Springfield has the first casino resort in Massachusetts with the opening of MGM Springfield, drawing conferences, entertainment and people to the area. Mayor Domenic Sarno will discuss all aspects of planning, building and now operating a casino resort in his city of almost 155,000 residents. Beverly, with a population of 41,000, has had a thriving downtown for years, but Mayor Michael Cahill continues to pursue improvement. This includes more transit-oriented development and a recent parking proposal, calling for more public parking. Learn more from these examples.

PANELISTS
Michael Cahill is the mayor of Beverly.
Tom Ashe is the chief of staff in Springfield.
MODERATOR
Anthony Sapienza is chair of the New Bedford Economic Development Council.

Health Literacy is Key to Lowering Health Care Costs
Friday, 3:45-5 p.m., Room 204, 2nd floor, Hynes Convention Center
Presented by the Massachusetts Municipal Personnel Association
Do your employees know how much radiation is in a CAT scan? That high-efficiency light bulbs can interfere with sleep? How quickly painkillers can lead to addiction? Only 12 percent of people in the United States are “health literate.” Health literacy correlates with use and spending; the more employees know, the more they realize that health care isn’t always good for them – and the less they needlessly and perhaps harmfully spend. This session will give you a chance to play Quizzify, the premier health literacy tool, and learn firsthand how health literacy can improve your own and your employees’ health choices.

PANELIST
Al Lewis is the founder of Quizzify, an author and a health care consultant.
MODERATOR
Jayne Schmitz is the Wellness project manager at MIIA.

Hot Topics in Municipal Law
Friday, 3:45-5 p.m., Room 210, 2nd floor, Hynes Convention Center
Presented by the Massachusetts Municipal Lawyers Association
This workshop will focus on significant developments in municipal law. Municipal attorneys will discuss the impact of key federal and state court cases, agency decisions, new laws and developing issues.

Workshop eligible for MIIA Rewards points

PANELISTS
Donna M. Brewer serves as a lead town counsel and heads the litigation and employment practice groups at the law firm Miyares and Harrington.
Ellen Callahan Doucette is the city solicitor in Woburn.
MODERATOR
Kathleen Colleary is the former chief of the Municipal Finance Law Bureau at the Division of Local Services and president of the Massachusetts Municipal Lawyers Association.

Hot Topics in Municipal Law: Selected Statutes and Cases for 2018

Making Social Media Work For You
Friday, 3:45-5 p.m., Room 203, 2nd floor, Hynes Convention Center
Presented by the Massachusetts Municipal Association
Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other platforms continue to change constituent conversations and crisis communications. Which platforms are the right fit for your community’s needs? How can you best take advantage of the instant connection created by these platforms while avoiding mixed messages? Hear from municipalities that are strategically using social media to share information from multiple departments while maintaining a cohesive message.

PANELISTS
Julie Jacobson is the town manager in Auburn.
Renan Pinheiro is a financial and social media coordinator in Framingham.
MODERATOR
Stephen Maio is the town administrator in Wakefield.

City of Framingham and Social Media – presentation
Town of Auburn Communications and Social Media Strategy – presentation

Public Right-of-Way Access: A Changing Regulatory Field
Friday, 3:45-5 p.m., Room 205, 2nd floor, Hynes Convention Center
Presented by the National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors
Everyone wants public right-of-way access: cable companies, telephone companies, cellular companies and traditional utilities. Now, the Federal Communications Commission is changing the rules. Join an intensive tutorial discussing where municipalities throughout the Commonwealth stand in light of new federal changes to right-of-way access, the release of presumptively reasonable fees, and new Small Wireless Facility “shot clocks.” This workshop will also look at the latest proposed rule-making that threatens traditional cable fees.

PANELISTS
Sean Carroll is Deputy General Counsel for the Department of Telecommunications and Cable.
Gerard Lavery Lederer is a partner with the law firm Best, Best & Krieger.
Nancy L. Werner is general counsel for the National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors.
MODERATOR
Mike Lynch is director of broadband and cable at the Boston Department of Innovation and Technology and the president of the National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors.

Public Right-of-Way Access: A Changing Regulatory Field, National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors – presentation
• The FCC’s Assault on Local Government Authority & Property Rights: Small Cells Order, Best, Best & Krieger – presentation
• Public Right-of-Way: A Changing Regulatory Field, MassDTC – presentation
MA Department of Telecommunications and Cable notice on mobile broadband deployment (PDF 144K)
Top Telecommunications Issues of 2019, Best, Best & Krieger (PDF 230K)

Stop Stealing From Neighbors: Building Your Finance Team
Friday, 3:45-5 p.m., Room 208, 2nd floor, Hynes Convention Center
Presented by the Massachusetts Municipal Management Association
Did the neighboring town just “poach” your finance director? Treasurer? It’s all too common and can be disruptive to a community. Many cities and towns are now planning to build their finance team bench, while others are looking at alternatives, like regionalizing or sharing services. Panelists will speak to all of these approaches, including a shared finance operation called the Hilltown Collaborative implemented in 2017, and the MMA and Suffolk’s new finance seminar, launching in spring 2019, to provide training to those in the private sector making the move to public finance positions.

PANELISTS
Zack Blake is chief of the Technical Assistance Bureau at the Division of Local Services.
Mel Kleckner is the town administrator in Brookline.
Sandy Pooler is the deputy town manager in Arlington.
Carl Valente is a retired town manager.
MODERATOR
Bernard Lynch is managing partner at Community Paradigm Associates and a retired town and city manager.

• Stop Stealing From Neighbors: Building Your Finance Team, DLS – presentation
• Stop Stealing From Neighbors: Building Your Finance Team, Kleckner – presentation

Succession Planning Tips to Achieve Unity Through Diversity
Friday, 3:45-5 p.m., Room 201, 2nd floor, Hynes Convention Center
Presented by the Massachusetts Municipal Personnel Association
Succession planning is a process for identifying and developing internal staff with the potential to fill key leadership positions within an organization. How can we diversify our workforce through succession planning, and what can cities and towns do to create a deep bench with a qualified talent pool? Learn the basics of succession planning: How to determine mission critical positions and assess workforce interest and employee readiness; the importance of a knowledge transfer assessment tool; and how to use innovative alternative methods for staffing.

Workshop eligible for MIIA Rewards points

PANELISTS
Joellen J. Cademartori is the principal at GovHR USA.
Sheila Keady-Rawson is the personnel director in Cambridge
MODERATOR
Vanessa Hale, the assistant town administrator and human resources director in Southborough, serves on the Massachusetts Municipal Personnel Association Board of Directors and is the MMPA Program Committee Chair.

Succession Planning: Tips to Achieving Unity Through Diversity – presentation
Succession Planning Key Elements, GovHR (PDF 140K)

Using Zoning to Encourage Aging in Place
Friday, 3:45-5 p.m., Room 209, 2nd floor, Hynes Convention Center
Presented by the Department of Housing and Community Development
In 2015, 18 percent of the state’s population was age 65-plus. By 2030, this demographic will increase to 27 percent, and by 2050 it will more than double. Across the Commonwealth, municipalities face challenges in crafting zoning, land-use policies and innovative housing practices that meet the needs of older adults, while also addressing environmental issues, transportation and other regional or statewide needs and laws. Hear from local officials who are implementing new ideas to help older adults stay in their community.

PANELISTS
Angela Cleveland is the economic development planner for the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission.
James Fuccione is the senior director at the Massachusetts Healthy Aging Collaborative.
Paul Materazzo is the planning director in Andover.
Marcy Ostberg is director of the Mayor’s Housing Innovation Lab in Boston.
MODERATOR
Emily Cooper is the chief housing officer for the Massachusetts Executive Office of Elder Affairs.

• Massachusetts Healthy Aging Collaborative – presentation
Housing Innovation Lab, Aging in Place Tools from Municipalities – presentation
Town of Andover, Using Zoning to Encourage Aging in Place – presentation
MVPC, Using Zoning to Encourage Aging in Place – presentation